Maid borrows over $3,000 from 9 loan sharks, but employer gives her second chance, Latest Singapore News - The New Paper
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Maid borrows over $3,000 from 9 loan sharks, but employer gives her second chance

This article is more than 12 months old

Even after finding out that her domestic helper borrowed some $3,000 from nine different illegal moneylenders, a woman decided to keep the maid under her employ.  

Speaking to Shin Min Daily News, the 49-year-old employer, who wanted to be known as Yan, shared that her Indonesian maid had worked for the family for four years. 

Yan had always been pleased with the helper’s work ethic, but she noticed a change at the start of this year.

"She became very distracted at work and was constantly on her phone," said Yan.

"When questioned, she told me that her older brother was in hospital and needed $3,000 for an operation," she added. 

Yan lent her the money, thinking that it would be the end of the issue.

But on April 26, Yan received a call from a man who said he was trying to get a hold of her helper. 

When she questioned her maid, she claimed that she didn't know the man. 

“Three days later, however, I received a text that my helper had borrowed money," said Yan.

The message contained photos of the maid's work permit.

A few days later, Yan received threatening video clips showing homes being splattered with red paint and set on fire. The loan sharks also took photos of Yan's home and sent them to her.

When pressed, the helper admitted to borrowing about $3,150 from nine loan sharks.

"After repaying over $1,000, she still owed them close to $2,000," Yan said, adding that she brought the maid to make a police report.

The helper told Shin Min she needed the money for her husband who hoped to get a job in Brunei, and said she was introduced to the loan sharks through a friend.

"I didn't know they were illegal moneylenders and didn't expect things to turn out like this, otherwise I would not have borrowed from them," said the helper, who cried and apologised to Yan. 

The helper also told Yan that she would forgo her salary to repay the sum borrowed.

Despite the scare, Yan said she doesn't want to send the maid back to Indonesia.

"She's a good person. I hope to give her a chance. If the loan sharks come again, I will continue to call the police," she said.

"I just hope my situation will remind employers and agents to warn maids against borrowing from illegal moneylenders."

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