Litterbugs to clean streets in the city as Corrective Work Order areas expand beyond heartland , Latest Singapore News - The New Paper
Singapore

Litterbugs to clean streets in the city as Corrective Work Order areas expand beyond heartland

Some litterbugs will have to don neon pink-and-yellow vests and clean the streets in the city, as the Corrective Work Order (CWO) areas expand beyond the heartland.

The first CWO sessions in the city were conducted in Chinatown on Tuesday and in Tanjong Pagar on Thursday.

The National Environment Agency (NEA) said on Friday that the move to expand CWO to the city aims to drive home the widespread impact of littering.

CWO requires recalcitrant offenders to clean public areas for between three and 12 hours. This regime serves to increase their awareness of the impact of littering, as well as experience the difficulties faced by cleaners.

From 2017 to 2021, the agency issued an average of 27,200 tickets for littering and high-rise littering every year. 

Over the same period, about 10,200 CWOs were issued to offenders.

In 2021, NEA issued about 15,500 tickets for littering and high-rise littering, about 3,900 fewer than in 2020.

NEA’s enforcement officers catch litterbugs at littering hot spots and crowded areas. 

Cigarette butts consistently top the list of littered items.

The majority of littering offenders are male and aged 18 to 35, the agency said.

Litterbugs are fined $300 for the first offence. High-rise littering offenders are sent to court.

Those prosecuted in court may be issued a fine and a CWO. 

Under the Environmental Public Health Act, the maximum fine for a littering offence is $2,000 for the first court conviction, $4,000 for the second, and $10,000 for subsequent convictions.

“Everyone has a part to play in upholding high standards of cleanliness and public health in Singapore,” said NEA’s Environmental Public Health Operations group director Tony Teo. He added that the agency will continue with educational and enforcement efforts to encourage the public to keep Singapore clean.

NATIONAL ENVIRONMENT AGENCYlitteringPUBLIC HEALTH AND HYGIENE